Connect with us

HEALTH

Who gets the extra Omicron booster?

Published

on

The 24/7 news cycle is as important to medicine as it is to politics, finance, or sports. IN MedPage Today, new information is released daily, but keeping up with it can be a challenge. To help our readers and for a little fun, here’s a 10-question quiz based on the news of the week. Topics include additional COVID boosters, cancer and cardiovascular disease risk, and the best diet to prevent aortic stiffness. After passing the test, scroll down the browser window to find the correct answers and explanations, as well as links to original articles.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

HEALTH

J Crew Sale April 2023: What to Buy

Published

on

We may earn commissions for links on this page, but we only recommend products that we support.

J.Crew Heritage Cotton Crew Neck Sweater

J.Crew Heritage Cotton Crew Neck Sweater

Now 67% discount

Rugby shirt with crew neck J

rugby shirt

Rugby shirt with crew neck J

Now 69% discount

J.Crew Heritage striped sweater in cotton jersey

Heritage Shaker Trim Striped Cotton Sweater

J.Crew Heritage striped sweater in cotton jersey

Now 71% discount

Advertising – Continue reading below

J.Crew cashmere raglan sweatshirt

Cashmere sweatshirt with raglan sleeves

J.Crew cashmere raglan sweatshirt

Now 68% discount

J.Crew long sleeve T-shirt

Well-worn long-sleeved T-shirt

J.Crew long sleeve T-shirt

Now 73% discount

J.Crew Heritage cotton knit sweater

Heritage Cotton Knit Sweater

J.Crew Heritage cotton knit sweater

Now 20% discount

Advertising – Continue reading below

J.Crew Western Fine-Wale Corduroy Shirt

Western Fine-Wale Corduroy Shirt

J.Crew Western Fine-Wale Corduroy Shirt

Now 73% discount

J.Crew vest sweater in jacquard cotton/linen blend

Fair Isle vest sweater in cotton and linen blend

J.Crew vest sweater in jacquard cotton/linen blend

Now 68% discount

J. Crew Broken, clothes-dyed, oxfords

Broken in clothes Stained Oxford

J. Crew Broken, clothes-dyed, oxfords

Now 73% discount

Advertising – Continue reading below

J.Crew Stretch Cotton Shirt with Peaked Collar

Stretch cotton shirt with pointed collar

J.Crew Stretch Cotton Shirt with Peaked Collar

Now 76% discount

J.Crew Mini Paisley tie in Italian wool blend

Mini Paisley tie in Italian wool blend

J.Crew Mini Paisley tie in Italian wool blend

Now 63% discount

J.Crew Abraham Moon & Sons English wool scarf

Abraham Moon & Sons English wool scarf

J.Crew Abraham Moon & Sons English wool scarf

Now 69% discount

Advertising – Continue reading below

J.Crew Solid Cashmere Scarf

Solid color cashmere scarf

J.Crew Solid Cashmere Scarf

Now 68% discount

J.Crew Secret Wash cotton poplin shirt

Secret Wash shirt in cotton poplin

J.Crew Secret Wash cotton poplin shirt

Now 60% discount

Men’s healthMen’s health logo

Junior Commercial Editor

Luke Guillory is Associate Commercial Editor for Esquire.

US men's health preview - all sections and videos

Advertising – Continue reading below

Advertising – Continue reading below

Continue Reading

HEALTH

Role Therapy: Can Dungeons & Dragons Help Improve Mental Health?

Published

on

From AI-powered chatbot apps to TikTok therapists offering 60-second videos on topics like trauma and perfectionism, it’s never been easier to get advice on improving your mental health. Now when it comes to tabletop RPGs like Dungeons and Dragons are becoming more and more popular, some seek to use them for therapeutic purposes.

Play Therapy UK aims to encourage socially excluded groups, including the homeless, people recovering from drug and alcohol addiction, and military veterans, to play games as a means of solving personal problems. The charity claims that the role-playing aspects of the sessions can improve social skills, help cope with trauma, and increase receptivity to therapy. New scientist joined the session in London to find out more.

Themes:

Continue Reading

HEALTH

This could be why your hair is turning gray – and other health stories you may have missed.

Published

on

Getty Images

It’s been a busy week, from lab leak theories at the COVID-19 origin hearing to the long-awaited Supreme Court ruling on access to the abortion pill mifepristone. But that’s not all that’s happening in healthcare. Here are some exciting updates you might have missed, according to Yahoo News partners.

New study may explain why your hair turns gray with age

Stem cells for hair coloring. (Courtesy of Springer-Nature Publishing or Nature)

A study published on Wednesday perhaps the answer to why our hair turns gray as we age, according to CBS News, a Yahoo News partner.

Researchers at NYU’s Grossman School of Medicine studied melanocyte stem cells in mice — a type of cell that also occurs in humans — and found that these cells can eventually get “stuck” with age, eventually losing the ability to move between growth zones. in the hair. particles and produce the pigment that provides hair color.

If this result also applies to humans, the researchers hope it could lead to a way to prevent hair from losing its youthful hue.

“The newly discovered mechanisms raise the possibility that the same fixed position of melanocyte stem cells could exist in humans,” Qi Song, lead investigator of the study, says in a press release. “If this is the case, this represents a potential route to reverse or prevent graying of human hair by helping stuck cells move back between the developing compartments of the hair follicle.”

UNICEF report says 12.7 million children in Africa missed vaccinations

A community health worker administers an oral polio vaccine during a home-based polio immunization campaign.

A community health worker administers an oral polio vaccine during a home-based polio immunization campaign. (Erikki Bonifas/AFP via Getty Images)

new report published by UNICEF On Thursday, 12.7 million children in Africa were found to have missed one or more vaccinations between 2019 and 2021 due to disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, leading to a “child survival crisis” on the continent, a Yahoo partner said. News Canadian press accused by UNICEF. “heavy demands on health systems, diversion of immunization resources to COVID-19 vaccinations, shortage of healthcare workers and self-isolation measures”, as well as conflict, climate change and vaccine distrust due to declining vaccination rates, which now leaves the continent more vulnerable to serious illnesses. Last year, 34 of Africa’s 54 countries experienced outbreaks of measles, cholera and poliovirus. Africa needs to vaccinate some 33 million children by 2025 to recover from COVID-19’s “destructive trail”, according to the World Health Organization.

Immunization rates have also suffered in other parts of the world. The report says that some 67 million children missed routine immunizations, with vaccination coverage falling in 112 countries. Vaccine skepticism also grew during this period, including in South Korea, Japan, Papua New Guinea and Ghana, where confidence fell by more than a third.

Elite athletes live longer than average people, study finds

elite female athletes' Life expectancy has increased by 22% in all sports, according to a new study.  (Getty images)

The lifespan of elite female athletes increased by 22% across all sports, according to a new study. (Getty images)

A study published The UK’s International Longevity Center (ILC) found on Wednesday that elite athletes can live up to five years longer than the rest of us, a Yahoo News Evening Standard partner reported.

The researchers looked at records of Commonwealth Games participants from 1930 and found significant differences in the life expectancy of medal winners compared to the life expectancy of people in the general population who were born in the same year.

“We have long known that sports are good for health, but our research shows the significant impact that top-level sport can have on the life expectancy of athletes around the world,” said Professor Les Mayhew, Deputy Head of Global Research at the ILC.

Male life expectancy increased by 29% with water sports, 25% with athletics and 24% with indoor sports, which the researchers say is between 4.5 and 5.3 extra years of life. Women’s life expectancy increased by 22%, or 3.9 years, in all sports.

Some other interesting findings noted by the researchers: wrestlers live longer than boxers; the life expectancy of long-distance runners is slightly higher than that of short-distance runners; and cycling was the only sport not associated with increased life expectancy.

New study links sugary drinks to early death in some people

Sweet soda drink

Many carbonated drinks contain sugar. (Getty images)

According to research published by the Harvard School of Public Health. T. H. Chana on Wednesday, high consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages such as sodas, fruit punch and lemonade was associated with an increased risk of premature death and cardiovascular disease among people with type 2 diabetes. It is reported by USA Today, partner of Yahoo News.

The study authors say the report, which includes data from 1980 to 2018, is one of the first large-scale studies examining the association between death or illness and alcohol use among people with type 2 diabetes.

“Drinks are an important component of our diet and their quality can vary greatly,” lead author Qi Song said in a press release. “People living with diabetes may benefit particularly from drinking healthy beverages, but data has been sparse. These findings help fill this knowledge gap and may inform patients and caregivers about diet and diabetes management.”

The study found that replacing one sweetened drink per day with an artificially sweetened drink was also associated with an 8% reduction in the risk of “all-cause mortality” and a 15% reduction in the risk of cardiovascular death; replacing a sugary drink with an unsweetened drink such as coffee, tea, water, or low-fat cow’s milk has been linked to even greater health benefits.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2023 Millennial One Media.