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CBP and ICE Launch El Paso Law Enforcement Operation as Migrant Numbers Rise Ahead of Section 42 End

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The Biden administration launches a “targeted enforcement operation” in El Paso, Texas on Tuesday to process and potentially deport and deport illegal immigrants in one of the border crossing hotspots – as numbers along the border soared ahead of the deadline the actions of the law. 42 later this week.

Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents and officers will conduct an operation in El Paso, where approximately 2,200 migrants are currently camped or living on the streets a few blocks from the main ports of entry connecting El Paso . Paso with the Mexican city of Juarez.

This comes amid a wider surge, with more than 26,000 people detained and more than 7,000 “breakouts” in just 72 hours, according to official statistics.

Fox cameras have already shown images of huge lines of migrants crossing part of Texas, most of them single adults.

FOX NEWS SHOT HUNDREDS OF MIGRANTS FLOWING TO TEXAS AS TITLE 42 DEVELOPMENT NEARS THE END

Migrants who recently crossed the U.S.-Mexico border are seen in Brownsville, Texas on Friday, May 5, 2023. (AP Photo/Veronica Cardenas)

This comes ahead of the end of Thursday’s Section 42 public health ordinance, which has been used since 2020 to rapidly expel hundreds of thousands of migrants due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In March, nearly half of all encounters with migrants ended in Section 42 expulsions.

The repeal of the order is expected to bring a huge number of migrants to the border who believe they will have a better chance of entering the US after the order ends. The Biden administration has said this is not true and has warned that it is tightening penalties for illegal entry while encouraging migrants to use expanded legal routes instead.

During the operation, agents will “process individuals for screening and inclusion in Section 42 or Section 8 exclusion procedures, as appropriate,” the CBP said. Those deemed to pose a threat to national security or public safety will be transferred to ICE for detention.

“As we have repeatedly stated, individuals who have no legal basis to remain will be removed,” Acting CBP Commissioner Troy Miller said in a statement. “People should not listen to smugglers’ lies and use legal defenses instead.”

BIDEN ADMIN WARNING MIGRANTS ENTERING Illegally ‘Expected by Removal’ on Conditions of Fear AFTER TALK 42

However, the agency stressed that none of the agencies will take action “at or near the location that would, to the greatest extent possible, restrict people’s access to essential services or participation in essential activities.”

Meanwhile, CBP will cut operations at the nearby port of entry in Paso del Norte. The agency encourages travelers to use alternative ports.

The Biden administration has been trying to discourage migrants from traveling north while taking a series of measures to deal with what could become a historic number of encounters in the coming days.

TILLIS, SINEMA INTRODUCED LAW ALLOWING MIGRANTS TO CONTINUE AFTER SECTION 42 ENDS

Last week, he announced the deployment of 1,500 troops to the border, as well as the establishment of processing centers for migrants throughout Latin America and a deal with Mexico. non-Mexican illegal immigrants.

The Department of Homeland Security also announced an additional $332 million in funding for NGOs and local governments to help migrants released from detention.

The administration has also upset immigration activists by introducing a rule that could revoke asylum eligibility for migrants if they cross the border illegally and cannot claim asylum in a country they have already traveled through.

Meanwhile, DHS Secretary Alejandro Mallorcas reiterates a statement that the border is not open and stresses that migrants could face consequences, including a re-entry ban and criminal prosecution if they illegally enter after Thursday.

Migrants Mayorkas Texas

DHS Secretary Alejandro Majorcas speaks to reporters in Brownsville, Texas. (Fox News)

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“The border is not open,” Mallorcas said last week in Texas. “It was not opened and will not be opened subsequently until May 11th. And smugglers who exploit vulnerable migrants are spreading disinformation. They are spreading false information, lying to lure vulnerable people to the southern border and these people will only be returned.”

Daniel Wallace and Bill Melugin of Fox News contributed to this report.

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2020 Census Misses Many Noncitizens, Bureau Estimates: NPR

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A masked man walks past a sign urging people to take the 2020 Census in Los Angeles.

Robin Beck/AFP via Getty Images


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Robin Beck/AFP via Getty Images


A masked man walks past a sign urging people to take the 2020 Census in Los Angeles.

Robin Beck/AFP via Getty Images

According to the latest nationwide count of people living in the United States, a significant proportion of non-U.S. residents may have been missed. Census Bureau report released last week.

The discovery comes after years of concern about census interference by the administration of former President Donald Trump, which likely prevented many illegal immigrants, green card holders and other non-citizens from participating in the 2020 count.

Constitution requires a decade-by-decade count of “the total number of people in each state”. Population is used to redistribute congressional seats and electoral college votes, as well as funnel about $1.5 trillion in federal money a year to local communities for public services.

But the bureau calculated the 2020 Census Day U.S. population based on a simulated count involving administrative records from government and third-party sources, up 2.3% from the actual count of $331.4 million.

The researchers found that this gap was likely caused by non-citizen residents who are missing from the agency’s count, especially those with “legal status unknown.” About 19.7% of non-citizens counted in simulations using administrative records had addresses that could not be matched with those counted in the 2020 Census.

This raises “the likelihood that the 2020 Census failed to collect data for a significant portion of noncitizens living in the United States,” the bureau said in a report.

An earlier study by the bureau warned of a similar scenario in light of the Trump administration’s failed attempt to add a question on US citizenship status to the 2020 Census. After news of the Trump officials’ plan began to circulate in late 2017, many participants focus group for graph marketing campaign said they planned to ignore the census due to fear that the answers to the question would be used to deport illegal immigrants.

By using a question to retrieve citizenship data, the agency also found that it could be more costly and less accurate than using administrative records.

This citizenship campaign was eventually blocked by the U.S. Supreme Court, which was later asked to evaluate Trump’s presidential memo that called for the impossibility of excluding illegal immigrants from the number used to allocate each state’s share of seats. US House of Representatives. After the high court ruled on the case, President Biden reversed Trump’s policies as one of his first executive actions.

However, the bureau’s latest report does not explicitly mention the Trump-era census controversy.

Instead, the researchers note that non-citizens are more likely than citizens to live at addresses that bureau staff did not attempt to contact for the 2020 census. Many of the noncitizens the bureau’s simulations counted lived in group or multi-unit dwellings near the US-Mexico border.

The bureau’s public information service did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the inconsistency between the study’s estimates and the tally.

The study was part of the bureau’s efforts to increase the use of administrative records to more accurately count historically underestimated populations, including non-U.S. residents, people of color, and children under the age of 5.

In addition to non-citizens, this simulated count produced higher numbers than the 2020 Census for men, children under 15, adults aged 25 to 64, blacks and whites who do not identify as Hispanic, and Hispanics.

The simulation had lower numbers for adults aged 65 to 74, Asian Americans who do not identify as Hispanic, and non-Hispanic people who identify with two or more races.

Edited Benjamin Swasey

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Support for Ukraine is critical to American security

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The invasion of Ukraine was the most significant geopolitical event since the end of the Cold War, perhaps an understatement.

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Elon Musk says Twitter will delete inactive accounts

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“We are clearing accounts that have not shown any activity for several years, so you will probably see a decrease in the number of subscribers,” Musk wrote on Monday.

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